Conservative Iowa Voters Favor Trump

By Gloria Coleman

The election is still happening, with many people opting to vote with mail-in ballots because of COVID-19 and personal preferences.

Among viewers of NBC News in the early stages of the evening, when the electoral votes were Biden with 131 and Trump with 98, there was a lot of excitement. From the Trump supporters, there was a great deal of tension, while from the Biden supporters there was huge excitement but also tension. At 9:40 p.m. CT, Iowa itself was 57.7 percent to Biden while only 40.7 percent to Trump, according to The Associated Press’s live stream of the Presidential Results. Due to the recent projection of Trump taking Iowa, this was a surprise to some people.

Iowa has a big Trump-devoted base, but this is still not conclusive for who will be voted in by their electoral vote. The reason for this, according to the New York Times, is because to most of the voters there, “Mr. Biden is seen as someone who wants to govern; Mr. Trump is seen as someone who wants to perform.”

At 10:35 pm CT the Associated Press showed that Trump was ahead in Iowa, with 50.3 percent of the state heading to him and 48 percent to Biden. This was a little expected, considering that Iowa is mostly a conservative state. In the 2016 election, Trump won the state with 51.1 percent over Hillary Clinton, who had a vote of 41.7 percent. Because of this, many people also think that Iowa will be one of the states to vote for Trump again in this 2020 election.

The race for Iowa was called by The Associated Press at 5.43 AM ET, with 92 percent of the reported votes in. Trump won this state by 52.7 percent, followed by Biden trailing with a 45.4 percent vote. This was one of the major swing states, according to the New York Times–one of the states that people needed to keep an eye on and could help sway the election one way or another; but obviously, it was not as important as Pennsylvania or Georgia, for which the results are still being awaited.

Iowa is generally purple, which means in 2 of the 4 elections, they vote Democrat, but in the other elections, they vote Republican. Florida and Ohio are also in this category based on the past four elections, the 2004-2016 presidential elections.

With Iowa being already announced, now the people are waiting on the vote-counting in the few swing states that are left, then the new president will finally be announced, and the mayhem will continue.